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— Upgrade or replace school buildings and facilitiesBond Measure —

Special District
November 8, 2016 —California General Election

Alisal Union School District
Measure M Bond Measure - 2/3 Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Election Results

Passed

8,034 votes yes (73.22%)

2,939 votes no (26.78%)

  • 100% of precincts reporting (18/18).
  • 10,973 ballots counted.

To repair/modernize neighborhood school classrooms, facilities, and technology infrastructure supporting programs in reading, math, science and arts; improve disabled student access; repair/replace fire safety, plumbing and electrical systems; with funding that cannot be taken by the State; shall Alisal Union School District rebuild Fremont Elementary School and Alisal Community School and construct one new elementary school to relieve overcrowding and improve student learning; by issuing $70 million in bonds at legal rates, with independent oversight, and no money for administrators?

Impartial analysis / Proposal

This measure would authorize the Alisa! Union School District ("the District") to issue $70
million in bonds for the purpose of improving school facilities. The measure, placed on the ballot
by the District's governing board ("the Board") makes no change to existing !aw and will become
effective if two-'thirds (66.7%) of the voters vote "yes" on the measure.

 

The bond proceeds may be expended to modernize, replace, renovate, construct, equip,
acquire and rebuild the District's facilities and not for any other purpose, and will exclude teacher
salaries and administrator costs. School facility improvement projects to be funded by bond
proceeds are included in the Bond Project List (included with the full-text of the measure).
Approval of the bond measure does not guarantee that particular projects will be funded.  The
Board has certified it has evaluated safety, class size reduction, enrollment growth and information
technology needs in developing the Bond Project List.

 

Principal and interest on the bonds will be payable from ad valorem taxes levied annually
on taxable real property within the District. These taxes would be in addition to the property taxes
currently levied on real property within the District. The amount of increased taxes each year
would depend upon the amount needed to pay the principal and interest. The District's Tax Rate
Statement reflects an estimate of the maximum property tax levies required to service the bonds.
The actual tax rates may vary depending on the timing of sales, number of bonds sold, and
increases in assessed valuations,  If issuance of the bonds causes the District to exceed its statutory
bonding limit (1 .25% of total property tax va!ue), the measure authorizes the District to seek a
waiver of this limit.

 

The District has committed to conduct performance and financial audits to ensure that bond
proceeds are spent as specified in the measure. Additionally, the District will form an independent
citizens' oversight committee to monitor expenditures. Annual reports will be filed with the Board
stating the amount of hinds collected and expended, and the status of the projects authorized by the
measure.

 

A "yes" vote on this measure is a vote in favor of the District issuing $70 million in bonds
for the purposes set forth in the full-'text of the measure.

A "no" vote on this measure is a vote against the District issuing $70 million in bonds for

the purposes set forth in the full-'text of the measure.

Arguments FOR

Every child deserves to learn in safe, quality school facilities. Help make it true for the children
of our community.
Vote yes on Measure M for Alisal students and schools.

Alisal Union School District schools have educated generations of local children. But some of our
schools have grown old and are overdue for repairs.
Alisal Community School is 80 years old
and Fremont Elementary School is 75 years old. Both are in need of essential repairs and
continuing upgrades. The state of our classrooms, facilities and technology is negatively impacting
teaching and learning.

Measure M provides a prudent, responsible plan to address only the most critical needs. NO other
funding currently exists to properly upgrade our local facilities.

Measure M will:
o     Improve access to classrooms and facilities for disabled students and community members.
o     Repair/Replace deteriorated roofs, plumbing, heating, ventilation, and electrical systems.
o     Update classrooms for science, math, music, art programs and other core academics.
o     Rebuild/Renovate Alisal Community School and Fremont Elementary School.
o     Upgrade safety and security systems.
o     Modernize outdated systems to support classroom instructional technology.
o     Relieve overcrowding by constructing a new elementary school.

 

Every penny from Measure M will benefit local Alisal schools. The State CANNOT take this
funding away.
Measure M will ensure that all students have equal access to 21 st Century
classrooms and school facilities.

Taxpayer protections are required. NO funds can be spent on administrators' salaries or
pensions. Independent Citizens' Oversight and mandatory audits ensure funds are spent properly.

Whether you have children or not, Measure M is a wise investment. Quality school facilities
support after-school and summer programs for youth to keep them off the streets, out of trouble
and away from drugs and gangs. Good schools protect property values and strengthen our
community.

Join teachers, parents, business and community leaders, and residents throughout Alisal; VOTE
YES on M for safe, quality schools.

 

www.MeasureM.net

 

Signatories: (Not included in word count)

1.Anna M. Caballero                  Former Mayor, City of Salinas

2. Jose de Jesus Rodriguez         Owner La Plaza Bakery

3.Fernando Armenta                  County Supervisor County of Monterey

4.Isabel Serrano                        2nd Grade Teacher Fremont Elementary School

5.Tony Barrera                            Salinas City Councilman

Arguments AGAINST

We at the Salinas Taxpayers Association are concerned that Alisal Union School District is taking
on too much debt by asking you to vote to let it borrow $70,000,000 from bond investors.

Do you know why 66.67% of people in the Alisal Union School District must vote Yes on Mea-
sure M in order to pass it?

 

It's because the debt for borrowing $70 million is TOO HIGH to be allowed by state law to pass
with 55%.

 

Very few school districts in California have wanted to borrow so much money that they need to
get 66.67% of voters to vote Yes.

 

The last school district that tried was the Vallejo City Unified School District in 2014. But people
who lived there rejected the school district's request to be allowed to take on so much debt.

 

You may not know that the Alisal Union School District has asked the State Board of Education
two times to take on more debt than allowed by state law. The Board of Education waived the
debt limit for the school district in 2005 and 2008.

 

Are you going to give permission for yet more debt and more borrowing in 2016?

 

We all know the bad things that happen when someone borrows too much money and can't pay it
back. You tell your friends to watch their money, but they ignore you and keep putting things on
their credit cards.

 

Alisal Union School District is asking you to let it borrow too much money. If it had a credit
card, you might say "it's time to cut it up."

Because there isn't a credit card to cut up, what you should do is vote NO on Measure M.

 

Keven Dayton, President Salinas Taxpayers Association

Replies to Arguments FOR

 

 

You don't have to agree with everything your community leaders say and do.

If they say something is good for you, ask them to prove it by answering some questions:

 

1.      Why do almost all of the other school districts in California ask people to pass bond
measures at 55%, but Alisa! Union School District wants so much money that it needs
66.67o/o of the vote?

 

2.Why are we going to borrow $70,OOO,O0O instead of $30,000,000 or $35,000,000?

 

3.      Why are we borrowing so much money that we're going above the debt limit in law
for bond measures that can pass with 550/o of the vote?

 

No one is saying that schools in the Alisa! Union School District don't need any work.

 

But that $70,OOO,O0O is BORROWED money. It is DEBT.

 

It has to be PAID BACK to bond investors. With INTEREST.

 

The amount your school district wants to borrow is so high that state law requires 66.67o/o
of the vote to pass it instead of 55%.

 

That $70,00O,OOO needs to come back to voters in 2018 at a lower amount.

 

Would you let your friends or family use a credit card that allowed you to borrow a higher
amount than everyone else can borrow?

 

Vote NO on Measure M.

 

 

Kevin Dayton
President
Salinas Taxpayers Association

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

The sole opponent of Measure M has no understanding of Alisal Union School District's schools,
facility NEEDS, students, or the District's finances in general.
The FACTS say YES on M!

 

FACT: Measure M is about one thing - maintaimn_g the quality of education in our local
elementary schools.

 

FACT: Measure M will help relieve overcrowding and improve student learning

 

FACT: Upgraded school facilities will support after-school and summer programs for youth to
keep them off the streets, out of trouble, away from drugs and gangs.

 

FACT: Two- thirds majority bonds are a common way for communities to address school needs,
and California communities have passed over 516 such bonds for school repairs.

 

FACT: Every penny from Measure M will benefit Alisal schools. By law, no Measure M funds
can be taken by the State or used for administrator salaries or pensions.

 

FACT: Measure M requires strict independent oversight and annual audits to ensure that AUSD
is held accountable.

 

FACT: Measure M qualifies AUSD for State matching funds when available, leveraging local
taxpayer dollars even further.

 

FACT: Alisal Community School and Fremont Elementary School are over 75 years old and in
CRITICAL need of repairs. Measure M is the only way to improve access for students with
disabilities, repair deteriorated roofs, plumbing, electrical systems and update classrooms for
science, math, music, art programs and other core academics.

 

oLcal homeowners, realtors, businesses, seniors, teachers, and parents agree; voting YES on M is
the most fiscally prudent way to give our kids safe and quality schools.

 

YES on M!

 

 

 

 Signatories: (NOT included in word count)

1. Noemi Licea                                 Parent, Fremont Elementary School

2. Elisa B. Lopez-Mariscal                42-year Alisal Resident

3. George Anzo                                President, Alisal Rotary

4. Maritza Lopez                             Teacher, Alisal Community School

5. Elias Nunez                                  Owner, Spectrum Auto Collision

Proposed legislation

INTRODUCTION

The Alisal Union School District serves a population of more than 9,000 students in twelve K-6 schools. The District has aging schools, and it faces other challenges to its capacity to adequately house all of its students. Many classrooms have not been renovated in more than 65 years. The need for improvement is particularly critical at Alisal Community School, built in 1936, and Fremont Elementary School, built in 1941. These two schools were built for 400 students; they are severely overcrowded with 800 students. District-wide, schools have tremendous needs, in order to support the demands of a 21st Century education. We must modernize outdated classrooms for core academics. We must repair or replace deteriorated roofs, plumbing, heating, ventilation, and electrical systems. We must repair or replace aging fire, safety, and security systems. And we must upgrade classrooms and technology for 21st Century learning. A much larger, and much longer term solution is needed to address these issues.

The State of California requires a local match, funded primarily through local, general obligation bonds, for school districts wishing to pursue matching state funds for the upgrade or replacement of school buildings and facilities. The millions of dollars potentially available through the State match allows local taxpayers to benefit from the tax dollars they already pay to Sacramento.  

It is imperative that our students are housed in safe schools. In addition, our students would benefit from complete, comprehensive, and efficient schools. We need to act locally to build safe and modern schools to ensure our students have the educational opportunities they deserve.

BONDS

To repair/modernize neighborhood school classrooms, facilities, and technology infrastructure supporting programs in reading, math, science and arts; improve disabled student access; repair/replace fire safety, plumbing and electrical systems; with funding that cannot be taken by the State; shall Alisal Union School District rebuild Fremont Elementary School and Alisal Community School and construct one new elementary school to relieve overcrowding and improve student learning; by issuing $70 million in bonds at legal rates, with independent oversight, and no money for administrators?
 
BONDS MAY BE ISSUED IN EXCESS OF THE STATUTORY BONDING LIMIT

Issuance of all of the authorized bonds might require the outstanding debt of the District to exceed its statutory bonding limit of 1.25% of the total assessed valuation of taxable property in the District. In that event, the District intends to seek a waiver of its bonding limit from the State Board of Education, which has the power to waive certain requirements of the Education Code applicable to the District. By approval of this proposition, the voters have authorized the District to seek such a waiver, and to issue authorized bonds in excess of the 1.25% limit as the State Board of Education may approve.

SCHOOL FACILITIES PROJECTS TO BE FUNDED FROM BOND PROCEEDS

As required by the California Constitution, the proceeds from the sale of the bonds will be used only for the purposes authorized under Article XIIIA of the California Constitution, including acquisition or improvement of real property for school facilities, as more specifically set forth in this Bond Measure, and costs incident thereto. Proceeds of the bonds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the cost of District staff when performing work on or necessary and incidental to the bond projects.

The scope of specific projects, the order of construction, priority, and completion is contingent on final project costs and the availability of needed funds, all as determined within the discretion of the Board of Trustees. Further, such projects are of the type that issuing the authorized general obligation bonds as stated will not cause the State to reduce any financial hardship contribution that would otherwise be available to the District had these bonds not been authorized, issued, and or expended for their stated purpose.  

These projects may include participation in the State Facility Program’s Joint-Use Program to gain matching funds for teacher education, multi-purpose rooms, gymnasiums, libraries, childcare, and other qualifying Joint-Use facilities. With respect to such joint-use projects, the bond funds authorized by this Measure may be used to pay all of the local share needed to qualify the projects for special State matching funds under the State Facility Program’s Joint-Use Program requirements.

ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES

If the bonds are approved, the Board of Trustees will implement the following accountability measures in accordance with State law:

(a)   use the bond proceeds only for the purposes authorized under Article XIIIA, including those purposes allowed by the Constitution as set forth in section 15100 of the Act that comprise the acquisition or improvement of real property, as more specifically set forth herein, and costs incident thereto, and not for any other purpose, including salaries and other routine school operating expenses;

(b)   conduct an annual, independent performance audit to ensure that the bond proceeds have been expended only for the purposes as set forth herein;

(c)   conduct an annual, independent financial audit of the proceeds from the sale of the Bonds until all of those proceeds have been expended for the purposes as set forth herein; and 

(d)   establish and appoint members to an independent citizens’ oversight committee to ensure that such proceeds are expended for the specific purposes set forth in the Bond Measure, and to annually report to the District and the public concerning the expenditure of bond proceeds. The citizens’ oversight committee shall be established, composed, and conduct itself in accordance with bylaws to be established by the Board, which Bylaws shall include, without limitation, the following permissive provisions:

(1)   a provision that all reasonable, good faith efforts shall be made to recruit members to the citizens’ oversight committee from each of the categories of membership listed in section 15282 of the Education Code but that failure to seat any particular category, so long as such efforts are made, shall not affect the valid establishment of the committee or its ability to discharge its duties.

(2)   a provision for a single member to serve in more than one such category shown in section 15282 of the Education Code.

(3)   a provision for the appointment of “proxies” for each member of the citizens’ oversight committee, in order for such a committee to achieve a quorum for the conduct of its business.

(4)   a provision permitting citizens’ oversight committee members to serve without term limitation.

STATE MATCHING FUNDS

California Education Code section 15122.5 requires the following statement to be included in this sample ballot:

"Approval of this bond measure does not guarantee that the proposed projects in the Alisal Union School District that are the subject of bonds under this measure will be funded beyond the local revenues generated by this bond measure. The school district's proposal for certain of the projects assumes the receipt of matching state funds, which are subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure."
 
ANNUAL TAX AMOUNT, RATE, AND DURATION

        The bonds shall bear interest at an annual rate not exceeding the statutory maximum. The maturity of the bonds shall not exceed the maximum term allowed by law at the time of issuance (currently 25 years if issued under Education Code section 15140, or 40 years if issued under Government Code section 53508, so long as the bonds are not capital appreciation bonds (“CABs,” which CABs are limited to 25 years)). Accordingly, as further set forth in the tax rate statement, the ad valorem tax will be levied at such rates and for so long as may be required to meet the debt service needs of the bonds proposed to be issued, including such bonds that may be issued to refund any approved bonds.

 

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