presents
Voter’s Edge California
Conozca la información antes de votar.
Presentado por
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
ACLU of CA@SDACLU
November 6, 2018 — Elección General de California
Distrito especial

Antelope Valley Health Care District
Measure H - 2/3 Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Resultados electorales

No se aprueba

63,287 votos si (64.89%)

34,239 votos no (35.11%)

100% de distritos activos (203/203).

Shall Antelope Valley Healthcare District issue 30-Year General Obligation Bonds, not to exceed $350 million, to improve patient care, increase patient capacity, reduce Emergency Room wait times, and ensure the hospital meets California's 2030 seismic earthquake safety standards by upgrading the existing hospital or building a new state-of-the-art hospital, at rates described in the Voter Guide, requiring independent audits and online transparency to ensure proper use of funds and protect taxpayers, be authorized?

¿Qué es esta propuesta?

Información básica sobre la iniciativa de ley — Información oficial sobre esta iniciativa

Análisis del analista legislativo / Proposal

Mary C. Wickham, County Counsel

Approval of Measure H (“Measure”) would authorize the Board of Directors (“Board”) of the Antelope Valley Healthcare District (“District”), which placed the Measure on the ballot by Resolution No. 072518A.1, to issue general obligation bonds in an amount not to exceed $350 million.

Proceeds from the sale of bonds authorized by the Measure shall be used only for the purposes specified in the Measure for the Antelope Valley Hospital Project (“Project”), including, but not limited to, leasing or acquiring land and/or constructing, furnishing, equipping, modernizing, and improving energy efficiency for a new hospital that meets seismic, fire, and accessibility requirements.

As required by law, tax proceeds shall be deposited in a special account, and an annual written report shall be made to the Board, showing the amount of funds collected and expended and the status of projects authorized to be funded by bond proceeds. The Project includes fiscal accountability measures and independent citizens’ oversight.

Bonds shall be issued under Government Code section 43600 et seq., Government Code section 53506 et seq., and/or any other legal provision. Bonds are expected to be issued in three series, beginning in 2019. The estimated cost of the Project is $350 million. The principal amount of the bonds shall not exceed the estimated cost of the Project. Estimated costs of the Project include legal or other fees, and other costs and expenses, incidental to, or connected with, the authorization, issuance, and sale of the bonds.

According to the District’s Tax Rate Statement, the best estimate of the average annual tax rate required to fund the bonds, based on assessed valuations available when the District filed the statement, is $28.27 per $100,000 of assessed valuation. The best estimate of the highest tax rate required to fund the bonds, based on assessed valuations available when the District filed the statement, is $30 per $100,000 of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2021-22. The final fiscal year the tax is estimated to be collected is 2050-51. The estimated total debt service required to be repaid if all bonds are issued and sold is $525 million, including principal and interest. Estimated tax rates are based on the assessed value of taxable property on official tax rolls, not on a property’s market value. Properties of taxpayers eligible for a property tax exemption, such as the homeowner’s exemption, will be taxed at a lower effective tax rate.

This Measure requires a two-thirds (2/3) vote for passage.

Tax rate

An election will be held in the Antelope Valley Healthcare District (the “District”) on November 6, 2018, on the question of issuing bonds in the principal amount of $350,000,000 to finance the Antelope Valley Healthcare District Hospital Project as described in the bond measure and Resolution No. 072518A, which submitted the bond measure to the District’s voters for approval at the November 6, 2018, election. If the bonds are approved, the District expects to sell the bonds in three series beginning in 2019. Principal and interest on the bonds will be paid from taxes levied on taxable property in the District. The following tax rate information is given to comply with Sections 9400-9404 of the Elections Code of the State of California.

Based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement:

1. The best estimate of the tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue during the first fiscal year after the sale of the first series of bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.029 per $100 ($29.99 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2019/20.

2. The best estimate of the tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue during the first fiscal year after the last sale of the bonds, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.030 per $100 ($30.00 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2022/23.

3. The best estimate of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing this statement, is $0.030 per $100 ($30.00 per $100,000) of assessed valuation in fiscal year 2021/22.

4. The best estimate of the weighted average annual tax rate which would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue over the entire life of the bond debt service, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of filing of this statement, is $0.028 per $100 ($28.27 per $100,000) of assessed valuation. The final fiscal year in which a tax is anticipated to be collected is 2050/51.

Voters should note that such estimated tax rates are specific to the repayment of bonds issued under this authorization and exclusive of any other bond authorizations approved or to be approved by the District or any other overlapping public agency.

Voters should note that the estimated tax rates are based on the assessed value of taxable property on the Los Angeles County’s official tax rolls, not on the property’s market value. In addition, taxpayers eligible for a property tax exemption, such as the homeowner’s exemption, will be taxed at a lower effective tax rate than described above. Certain taxpayers may also be eligible to postpone payment of taxes. Property owners should consult their own property tax bills and the County Assessor to determine their property’s assessed value and any applicable tax exemptions.

The actual tax rates and the years in which they will apply may vary from those presently estimated, due to variations from these estimates in the timing of bond sales, the amount of bonds sold and market interest rates at the time of each sale, and actual assessed valuations over the term of repayment of the bonds. The estimates are based upon the District’s projections and are not binding upon the District. The dates of sale and the amount of bonds sold at any given time will be determined by the District based on the need for construction funds and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold will depend on the bond market at the time of each sale. Actual future assessed valuation will depend upon the amount and value of taxable property within the District as determined by the County Assessor in the annual assessment and the equalization process.

KRISTINA HONG
Chair, Board of Directors
Antelope Valley Healthcare District

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Argumento A FAVOR

When you’re injured or sick, the last thing you want to do is wait in line to see a doctor. Antelope Valley Hospital has an overworked and overcrowded Emergency Room. With patients waiting in the hallways of the Emergency Room, we must increase our available beds in the hospital, and expand our capacity in the Emergency Room.

That’s why we need to pass Measure H.

Do you believe that we need to make improvements to Antelope Valley Hospital to modernize the technology and facilities so that patients can receive the best possible care? If so, Vote Yes on Measure H.

Do you trust local doctors, nurses and first responders who work at Antelope Valley Hospital and provide lifesaving care 24/7/365? If so, Vote Yes on Measure H.

Measure H is simple and does two things: it allows hospital officials to invest $350 million to reduce Emergency Room wait times, increase patient capacity and improve patient care. As the only trauma center within 50 miles, these improvements are critical to provide the life-saving hospital facilities needed to ensure cutting-edge medical care.

Measure H protects taxpayers by requiring financial audits and online transparency. Every dollar spent is used to reduce Emergency Room wait times and improve the hospital. Any costs above $350 million would be paid for privately at no cost to taxpayers.

Antelope Valley leaders including doctors, nurses, small business owners and non-profit representatives all say Vote Yes on Measure H. There is no organized opposition because it will protect you and your family’s right to quality medical care.

Join us and Vote YES on Measure H.

PRAMOD KADAMBI, M.D.
AVH Chief of Staff

FERDINAND PANOUSSI, D.O.
Medical Director, Hospitalist

AYA SMITH, RN
AVH Chief Nursing Officer

PAVEL PETRIK, M.D.
AVH Trauma Medical Director

MARK BROWN, M.D.
AVH Emergency Dept. Chairman

Argumento EN CONTRA

In November, 2017, Antelope Valley Healthcare District voters approved Measure H which allowed the Healthcare District to lease Antelope Valley Hospital to a nonprofit corporation. All assets were to be transferred to the new corporation except 126 Million in bond debt which would remain with the Healthcare District. The new corporation would pay the Healthcare District to pay interest on the bonds.

Now, the A.V. Healthcare District is asking these same voters to approve a general obligation bond for 350 million dollars to be paid by property owners at $25 per $100,000 assessed value of their property.

First of all, property owners may not be able to afford this new tax. In 2012, voters approved a general obligation bond for the Lancaster School District and in 2016 voters approved a 350 million dollar bond measure for the A.V. College District. Both of these bonds are financed by property owners whose assessed values of their properties and resulting taxes are going up, too.

Secondly, the Healthcare District is advocating building a new hospital with retrofitting of some of the other buildings on campus. This analysis was done after a presentation by one firm that presented options to the Healthcare District and new Hospital Corporation. Additional analysis is needed to see if there are other options to this scenario. Also, what does the public think of any future plans?

A prior CEO reached out to the federal department of Housing and Urban Department and was in the process of reaching out to the Veterans Administration for assistance before he departed. Why can’t these agencies be approached again before the property owners are asked to pay new taxes?

This measure is too costly and all of the options have not been considered before the voters are asked to contribute their tax dollars. It should be defeated and reconsidered some other time.

MICHAEL P. RIVES

Refutación al argumento A FAVOR

The E.R. Department at AV Hospital has been a topic of discussion during the last three elections for the Board of Directors.

Recently, under a new ER manager, some changes have been made such as separating the different groups of patients in the ER. It cost nothing to make these changes. It has improved the environment in the ER.

At a recent AV District Board Meeting, an ER physician recommended that a vacant record room be utilized to enlarge the ER. (Records are now kept electronically not in paper files in most cases.) This would increase the number of beds dramatically in the ER and would not require building a new hospital.

The problem with Measure H is that we don’t know exactly what the bond measure will be used for to improve the hospital. It was worded to be for retrofitting and, maybe, a new hospital. Now, it is being promoted as a new ER Department.

The Healthcare District is in debt for $136 million in bonds now. If, $350 million dollars is added, then the district would have almost a half a billion dollars outstanding. The interest on bonds has to be paid or the bondholders can exercise their options to protect themselves.

It would be wiser if the District used existing resources to improve its credit rating, spend existing funds to improve the ER Department as much as possible, began an affordable retrofitting program, and, finally, submit concrete proposals for improvements before asking the taxpayers to pay for bonds through their property taxes.

MICHAEL P. RIVES

Refutación al argumento EN CONTRA

When your family needs medical attention, you shouldn’t have to spend hours waiting in an emergency room. You deserve immediate care in a modern hospital.

Antelope Valley Hospital’s Emergency Room is one of the busiest in America, and the only trauma center within 50 miles. You deserve modern facilities without spending hours in a waiting room. Measure H will reduce wait times and modernize Antelope Valley Hospital. When you vote yes, you vote for your own health and safety.

Don’t be fooled. Measure H has no organized opposition. Good government advocates who protect taxpayer dollars support Measure H because it is a fiscally responsible way to improve our health care. It has specific provisions requiring all money is spent wisely and local workers making the improvements will be highly skilled. Audits and online transparency requirements will protect you.

Nurses, doctors and emergency responders have studied Measure H. They say vote Yes. We trust them with our lives. We should trust them to know what’s best for our hospital.

Lancaster and Palmdale leaders believe you deserve access to the best health care.

Please join us and vote Yes on Measure H.

MARK BROWN, M.D.
AVH Emergency Dept. Chairman

PAVEL PETRIK, M.D.
AVH Trauma Medical Director

FERDINAND PANOUSSI, D.O.
Medical Director, Hospitalist

PRAMOD KADAMBI, M.D.
AVH Chief of Staff

AYA SMITH, RN
AVH Chief Nursing Officer

Use tabs to select your choice. Use return to create a choice. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.

Comparta este sitio para ayudar a otras personas a investigar sus opciones para las votaciones.

PUBLISHING:PRODUCTION SERVER:PRODUCTION